Everybody has a story – so let’s tell it!

Everybody has a story – so let’s tell it!

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You are warmly invited to come and hear Rev Dr Paul Beasley-Murray speaking on the topic “Everybody has a story – so let’s tell it!” at our Henderson Campus on the evening of Thursday 12 March.

[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]Writing an autobiography is not a form of narcissism, but a sign of our humanity. So say a group of scholars, who suggest that humans are first and foremost a story-telling species (homo narrans) rather than a reasoning species (home sapiens).

None of this Paul knew when he set out to tell his story. He chose the title This Is My Story: A Story of Life, Faith and Ministry, as a simple way of saying to his grandchildren: “this is who I am”. The story developed in the telling. It became not just a story of a life, but also a story of faith; a story of the development of a leader and a story of ministry in God’s church. In what has been a controversial life, Paul spelt out ‘his side’ of the story, recognising that one day there will be a final telling of the story before the throne of God when that story will find final clarity.

After telling a little of his story, Paul will encourage listeners to tell their story too, whether on a few sheets of paper or a full autobiography![/vc_column_text][vc_separator color=”custom” style=”shadow” border_width=”3″ accent_color=”#003e53″][vc_column_text]

About the Speaker

Paul Beasley-Murray is a well-known British Baptist minister with an international reputation as a preacher, author, and blogger. Ordained in 1970, he served with the Baptist Missionary Society in Congo/Zaire, where he taught New Testament and Greek in the Protestant Theological Faculty of the National University. He then pastored two churches: Altrincham Baptist Church, Cheshire and Central Baptist Church, Essex, with both churches transformed into strong, vibrant, growing communities under his leadership. He was also Principal of Spurgeon’s College, London (1986-1992).

Paul chairs the College of Baptist Ministers and leads a fellowship for retired ministers in Mid- and South Essex, which he helped to found. He also engages in a wider ministry of preaching and teaching in a wide variety of contexts. In retirement Paul has published a four-volume guide to ministry, Living Out the Call (Feed-a-Read 2015; revised 2016); updated two booklets on pastoral care, A Loved One Dies: Help in the first few weeks and Happy Ever After? A workbook for couples preparing for marriage (College of Baptist Ministers, 2017); and written his autobiography; This is my story: a story of life, faith, and ministry (Wipf & Stock, 2018). Together with Terry Calkin, he has also written for pastors in the developing world four short books on The Four Foundations of Leadership which await publishing. Every Thursday he posts a blog relating to Church Matters.

Paul will be teaching a Postgraduate course at Laidlaw the week of 9-13 March on “Living out the Call: Rising to the Challenge of being a Vocational leader in God’s Church Today”.[/vc_column_text][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][vc_text_separator title=”RSVP by 10 March” color=”custom” style=”double” border_width=”3″ accent_color=”#003e53″][vc_btn title=”REGISTER by email” style=”outline-custom” outline_custom_color=”#003e53″ outline_custom_hover_background=”#003e53″ outline_custom_hover_text=”#ffffff” shape=”square” align=”center” i_align=”right” i_icon_fontawesome=”fas fa-at” button_block=”true” add_icon=”true” link=”url:mailto%3Aevents%40laidlaw.ac.nz||target:%20_blank|”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/3″][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Blessed are the Troublemakers: Christianity and the Enlightenment

Blessed are the Troublemakers: Christianity and the Enlightenment

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]The Enlightenment is often seen as an anti-Christian movement, rich in cynicism, skepticism, and a scientific consciousness intolerant of supernatural faith. Although some of this narrative holds up to historical enquiry, the notion of a ‘warfare’ between reason and faith is misleading for the simple reason that much of the period’s hostility to theology was motivated by Christian ethics and spirituality. The Enlightenment was, in many ways, a protest of faith against faith – an extension of the subversive energies of the European Reformation.

This lecture argues that some of the most dynamic impulses of the Enlightenment era were products of a biblical imagination, including religious tolerance, the sanctity of conscience, and human equality. Important as this is in itself, the lecture will also argue that such an understanding can help to open fresh avenues of dialogue between Christian and secular thought.

For more details about the workshop, the facilitator and to register, CLICK HERE.[/vc_column_text][vc_column_text]

About the Speaker

Dominic Erdozain earned his PhD in history at Cambridge University. He taught for six years at King’s College London before moving to Atlanta, where he is a scholar in residence at Emory University. He is the author of The Soul of Doubt: the Religious Roots of Unbelief from Luther to Marx (Oxford, 2015) and the editor of The Dangerous God: Christianity and the Soviet Experiment (Northern Illinois, 2017). He is currently writing a book on the American gun culture, entitled God, Guns and Democracy in America, which will be published by Oxford University Press in 2020.

He has spoken in churches, schools and non-academic conferences on a wide range of issues, from the abolition of slavery to the history of the Olympic Games.  He is a member of the Institute of Historical Research, where he co-convenes the Modern Religious History seminar. In September, Dominic will be a visiting scholar in the Laidlaw Graduate School teaching the postgraduate course, Knowledge, Reality and God: Theology and Western Thought.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Invitation yo hear Professor Craig Keener

Laidlaw is excited to be hosting one of the world’s leading New Testament scholars and authors in September.  More than a million copies of his books are in circulation, the most popular being The IVP Bible Background Commentary: New Testament, which provides cultural background on each passage of the New Testament.  On Wednesday 25 September, Professor Keener will be giving two public lectures at our Henderson campus.  The first in the afternoon on, “Mission of the Church in the 21st Century in the face of Materialism”; the second in the evening on, “Women in Ministry”.

For more details about the public lecture, the facilitator and to register, CLICK HERE.

Āpōpō – Friends supporting friends – Making it to the next day

āpōpō: the next day

The Āpōpō programme seeks to empower friends and people who work with youth with easy to learn tips and tools to move the metaphorical fence far away from the edge of the cliff. Āpōpō means The Next Day, because for those struggling in this area, the idea of making it to the next day is a powerful one.

Āpōpō purses the idea that it will take a village to respond to this challenge, not only professionals. Āpōpō is not creating mental health professionals but merely empowering through experiential learning how those closest to us can help and change the statistics that make for grim reading.

For more details about the workshop, the facilitator and to register, CLICK HERE.